Tag-Archive for » health «

Cold Laser Therapy

Cold Laser Therapy

Drug-free, Surgery-free, Pain-free, Relief For Your Companion.

Desert Care Animal Hospital is offering Cold Laser Therapy treatments. As our best friends age, recover from trauma, or simply need relief from everyday aches and pains this technology offers relief. Pets benefit from reduced inflammation and pain and show an increased range of motion and show mobility earlier in the recovery process. Veterinary medicine, chiropractors, and sports medicine (including major league sports teams) are embracing this new technology!

Treatments

What conditions can be treated with cold laser?

Cold laser therapy is used to treat multiple ailments and injuries in dogs and cats. Treatable conditions include:

  • Joint injuries
  • Ligament or tendon injuries
  • Fractures
  • Muscle sprains or strains
  • Skin lesions or abrasions
  • Post-trauma wounds
  • Post-surgical incisions
  • Arthritis
  • Musculoskeletal diseases
  • Nerve injury

What does the cold laser do?

Cold laser uses a beam of light to stimulate damaged cells to produce more energy. The overall cellular function is increased, allowing for rapid absorption of nutrients, elimination of wastes, and reproduction of new cells. The new cellular activity aids in:

  • Alleviating chronic or acute pain
  • Reducing inflammation
  • Reducing swelling
  • Increasing circulation
  • Speeding up healing and recovery
  • Release of endorphin, the body’s natural pain reliever

What are the treatments like?

After our veterinarian has prescribed a treatment regimen, treatments are performed by a technician and owners remain with their pet. The laser is applied directly to the surface of the skin or held just above the skin if direct contact is too painful. Therapy usually needs multiple administrations within the first one to two weeks of treatment. After the initial set, treatments are spread progressively further apart until the maintenance level needed by your pet is reached.

Are their any risks involved?

There are no known side effects from the administration of cold laser therapy. Technicians administering treatment and owners present during therapy must wear protective eye wear.

Ask us about Cold Laser on your next visit to Desert Care Animal Hospital.

A Safe Halloween for you & your pets

A Safe Halloweencat-halloween

Halloween can be a frightening time for pet owners across the country. It can be scary for our furry friends too. Desert Care Animal Hospital encourages pet owners to protect their four-legged family members this October by being mindful of their F.E.A.R. – food, environment, attire, and recovery.

Food

Halloween means candy and tasty treats are plentiful and easily accessible to young children and pets. Candy, especially chocolate, is toxic to animals and can cause vomiting, restlessness, heart disturbances, and even death. Although grapes and raisins are a healthy alternative snack for humans, they can be potentially deadly for dogs. These fruits contain an unknown toxin that can damage dogs’ kidneys and cause kidney failure.

Candy wrappers can also cause health problems. Animals may eat the wrapper, causing obstruction or irritation to the pet’s digestive system. Candy and wrappers should be kept out of pets’ reach and young children should be taught not to share Halloween goodies with their pet. Seasonal foods such as pumpkins and corn may cause minor stomach irritation; however, they are relatively safe for Fluffy and Fido. Pumpkin seeds may cause digestive system obstruction if consumed by smaller animals.

Environment

Due to the increased foot traffic and commotion in your neighborhood, outdoor pets should be kept indoors during the days surrounding Halloween. Unsupervised outdoor animals are susceptible to stress, inhumane practical jokes or theft. Providing a safe, stress free environment reduces the probability of your beloved friend injuring himself or others. Loud and excessive noise created by trick-or-treaters can frighten your cat or dog. Animals should be kept away from the door and out of hearing range of a constantly ringing doorbell and excited children. Fluffy or Fido should be put in a room where they will not be disturbed by noise and activity. A frightened or upset pet may run out the door at the first opportunity and could harm the children in its way.

Be sure decorations are safe from the paws and teeth of curious pets. Crepe paper streamers, fake cobwebs, glow sticks, plastic spiders and cardboard wall hangings can easily be chewed and swallowed, damaging your pet’s digestive tract. Animals can also tip over the candle in a jack-o-lantern and burn themselves or start a fire. Keep decorations out of animals’ reach, and maintain supervision if they play nearby.

Attire

Transforming your pet into a superhero, witch, ghost, or goblin can be a stressful and unpleasant experience. Some animals love to dress up, but others dread it. If your furry friend doesn’t mind dressing up, make sure that you select a costume that doesn’t restrict his normal movements, breathing or vision. Costumes that interfere with these things can cause ligament or joint injuries, and animals are more likely to bite if their vision is impaired. Pets are better off left at home during trick-or-treating excursions. However, if they do tag along, it is best to keep them on a very short leash and harness to keep them from fighting with other animals, eating the treats, becoming victims of practical jokes – as black cats often do – or biting strangers they encounter.

Recovery

It is important to have a plan if your pet becomes sick, injured or lost this Halloween season. Since time is critical during any unfortunate incident, pet parents should always have contact information for their veterinarian and local animal shelters easily accessible. Also, pet owners need to be aware that not all veterinarians are available 24 hours.  It is also important to update your pet’s identification tags and micro chip information each time you move or change phone numbers so that current contact information is always available on your pet.

Desert Care Animal Hospital wishes you a safe and Happy Halloween for you and your pets!

 

 

Canine Parvovirus

Canine Parvovirus

Dr. Lila Miller, D.V.M., Sr. Director, Animal Sciences and Vet Advisor, ASPCA

IMG_0157

Canine Parvovirus is a highly contagious viral disease that is one of the most common causes of diarrhea in dogs under 6 months of age. It first appeared in the late 1970s, and is now one of the most common serious dog disease problems encountered in animal shelters, displacing distemper for that distinction. It is reported in coyotes, foxes, and wolves and probably affects most, if not all, members of the canine family. Puppies are the most susceptible, especially if they have roundworms or other internal intestinal parasites, protozoa (such as Coccidia) or bacteria. Despite aggressive therapy, parvo may have a high fatality rate. On the other hand, many adult dogs that become infected never actually show clinical signs of disease. Rottweilers, Dobermans, Pit Bulls, German shepherds and Labrador retrievers seem to be at higher risk for the disease.

  more…

Foxtails and Pets

Foreign Body Is an Outdoor Threat

Jennifer Hawkins, DVM

What Is a Foxtail?

Foxtails are grass awns, or seeds, that are prevalent in the Western United States. These awns look like barley and have tiny spikes on them such that they easily stick to fur and then migrate in one direction only. Thus, once they get caught in the fur of an animal, they often wind their way deeper into the fur coat and penetrate the skin.

more…